Our Values

Our Values

  • Nutrition: The most economically poor are also the most nutritionally poor. We aim to provide healthy meals, nutrition focused food items to individuals and families in need.
  • Empowerment: We provide educational information to our clients and sit with them to answer any questions they have. We will also provide the tools and means necessary for our clients to build confidence while also providing a safe and welcoming environment with no judgement.
  • Advocacy: We will be a voice in the community about hunger, nutrition, welfare.
  • Respect: Treating others as we would want to be treated.
  • Collaboration: Together as a community, we can achieve a greater good.
  • Integrity: We act with honesty, trust, and openness with donors, volunteers, clients, and within the law.
  • Humility: We understand no one is protected from unforeseen circumstances that may result in a need for help.
  • Beneficiaries: Malnourished children, the elderly, Nursing mothers, pregnant women, the homeless and less priviledge.

Cause We Are Fighting For

There are many people struggling to feed their families in these uncertain times. The coronavirus pandemic has shifted the world’s attention to the deplorable health sector in many countries. However, enough attention has not been given to hunger pandemic, which is becoming apparent. It should be noted that Food supply is part of the immediate health response to COVID-19.

 Research shows that 23% of people in Sub-Saharan Africa are undernourished. According to the United Nations World Food Programme estimates, the number of people facing acute food insecurity as a result of the global economic fallout from COVID-19 could double this year to 265 million and much of that impact will be felt in Africa. With unemployment rates skyrocketing, it is crucial that vulnerable people have access to nutritious food.
COVID-19 will impact most marginalized children from low-income families if actionable measures are not put in place. The poorest and vulnerable households will bear the brunt, destroying the hopes of a generation of children. The socioeconomic impact of the pandemic will push many poor households to turn to desperate measures just to survive. Children could face increased risk of child labour or sexual exploitation or of child marriage, as families struggle to feed their families.
Few of the facts about hunger:
  • One-third of children under five are stunted. This statistic is particularly concerning because it is twice the rate of Thailand and three times the rate of Tunisia. Stunting in children is a common symptom of undernourishment and can only be alleviated with a steady supply of adequate food.
  • The insurgency in the country has led to many displaced people without access to food. The reign of the extremist group has left 8.5 million people in need of humanitarian assistance in Nigeria.
  • On top of the rates of displacement, 5.1 million Nigerians are malnourished. Being on the move makes food sources even less reliable.
The hunger pandemic should be a no-no in Nigeria, Africa and the world.
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